Home/Posts/Uncategorized/Guest Post: Pros/Cons of a Next Gen Pastor

Guest Post: Pros/Cons of a Next Gen Pastor

Guest Post by Justin Minter

I remember finishing up my last semester from Boyce Bible College like yesterday. I felt like an accomplished individual as I managed being a student-missionary at The University of Louisville, a dean’s list student ministry major, and a chauffeur. I believed I was ready to change the world because of how easy it was to balance life. I had witnessed my college pastor grow an incredible college ministry while working at Sprint full-time. I told myself, if he could do it with such limited resources, I could surely do students and college as a full-time gig.

So then I became a Next Gen Pastor at my hometown church where I oversee students and young adults. And I had no idea what I was committing myself to… While I love my journey as a Next Gen Pastor. I have had many struggles along the way. So if you’re looking to become an overseer of multiple ministries, here are some things to think about:

Pros

You see God work in crazy ways.

You learn to streamline your work.

It’s easier to see the big picture and your ministries can work together.

One or both of your ministries is going through a great season.

You spend a lot more time with leaders.

You will have more quality leaders.

You get to work with multiple ministries that you have a heart for.

Cons

It’s more difficult to celebrate what God is doing unless you make it a priority.

Your time, thoughts, and resources can be constantly divided.

One or both of your ministries is going through a rough season.

You spend less time with students.

You will require more quality leaders.

It will try to require more of your marriage and family.

Regardless if you oversee multiple ministries or not. We could all learn a lesson from these pros/cons.

Have a clear vision and streamline your work.

Too many of us waste our time. Use a project manager to help you be productive and accomplish task. I only do tasks that work towards my vision. Our church uses teamwork and it changed our production drastically. Track your workflow and tweak it to help you accomplish your goals.

Enjoy the time you spend with students and don’t waste it.

You are more than their activities director. Have an intentional plan to help your students grow. Identify your time with students. Is it all relational? Or is some of it mentoring? Be intentional to encourage students to grow as you meet with them.

Invest into building as many quality leaders as you can.

Have a plan for potential leaders, new leaders, and current leaders. Maybe you just want to have a relationship with potential leaders. Invite them to hangout with your leaders. Walk through a book with new leaders. Do ministry with your current leaders. Create a plan.

Protect your time at home.

I have a heart to reach students and young adults. But it’s difficult on my wife to do both. So we have to be intentional to guard our time. Your spouse or family probably doesn’t have the same heart for your ministry as you do. Don’t drag them into something. We can’t have our families hating or feeling stressed with ministry.

Celebrate what the Lord is doing.

The less time you have towards something, the more you have to cut out. Don’t cut out celebrating God’s blessings. Lay out some wins from your ministry’s vision and celebrate them!

By | 2017-06-07T11:57:58+00:00 June 10th, 2017|Uncategorized|1 Comment

About the Author:

Justin Knowles has been a pastor for the last 8 years and is the Lead Student Ministries Pastor at Christ’s Church of the Valley in San Dimas, CA. He oversees 7th-12th grade and has an amazing team that put on midweek services for junior high and high school students. He is passionate about reaching all kinds of students for Jesus, leading teams and writing about his learnings in ministry on the blog.

One Comment

  1. Anonymous June 12, 2017 at 2:16 pm - Reply

    I like your thoughts. However, what about those who don’t get to choose all of the different ministries they are a part of? What if they don’t have total say in what their schedule is like? Those might be some interesting counter points to this.

Leave a Reply